Pembroke Stroll

A lineup of Stroll for Liver participants walk holding a large Stroll for Liver banner

Join us for the 1st Pembroke Stroll for Liver! 

Saturday, June 6th, 2020.

Help us change the future for Canadians with liver disease! Join us for the Stroll for Liver –a family friendly, community-based walk/run event dedicated to raising funds for liver research and education.​everyone’s support at this inaugural event.

1 in 4 Canadians may be affected by liver disease – Carrie is one of them.

Carrie was living a great life. She had many good friends, married her soul mate, and together they had three healthy, children—two boys and a girl. As a mom, she was heavily involved with her kids’ extracurricular activities: hockey, horses, gymnastics, dance, and more.

Carrie was fit and active, regularly running half marathons and working out with her husband.

Until her diagnosis, Carrie worked hard as a security officer at Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, a job that involved lots of shift work and overtime. Life was good for Carrie–no big obstacles just a happy normal life. Continue reading Carrie’s story here.

Carrie and Dan decided to bring the Canadian Liver Foundation’s annual STROLL for LIVER to Pembroke join them as they bring awareness of liver health and raise much-needed funds for liver research and education.

Register now.

Registration is free, and every dollar raised will go towards our mission of bringing research to life for all Canadians by providing more studies into how we can better prevent, diagnose, treat or cure liver disease. Your participation will help increase the level of liver disease awareness in your community!

Register now

Registration & Health Fair and Raffle: 10:00 AM to 10:30 AM
Opening Remarks and Warm Up: 10:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Walk/Run: (45-60 minutes)  11:00 AM to 11:45 AM
Lunch and Family Entertainment: 11:45 AM to 12:30 PM
Thank You and Raffle Draw: 12:30 PM to 1:00 PM

Pembroke Waterfront Park, 11 Albert St. in Pembroke (closest main intersection is Fred Blackstein Blvd. and Alexander St.). The STROLL for LIVER’s event will be located at the Amphitheatre. Free parking available on site.

Register Now! Click here.

Already registered? Print a pledge form and don’t forget to bring it with you everywhere you go. Can’t make the stroll? You can still support the event by making a donation from your desktop or mobile device.

For more information or for sponsorship and volunteer opportunities please contact Meghann Darroch at 1 (844) 316-6990 or by email at mdarroch@liver.ca

Meet Carrie.

Carrie was living a great life. She had many good friends, married her soul mate, and together they had three healthy, children—two boys and a girl. As a mom, she was heavily involved with her kids’ extracurricular activities: hockey, horses, gymnastics, dance, and more.

Carrie was fit and active, regularly running half marathons and working out with her husband.

Until her diagnosis, Carrie worked hard as a security officer at Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, a job that involved lots of shift work and overtime. Life was good for Carrie–no big obstacles just a happy normal life.

A woman with tubes at the hospital during a liver transplantThen, in 2015, Carrie’s world changed. She began to experience flu-like symptoms, like fever and pain in her joints. She was working lots of overtime and figured she was just not doing well without adequate sleep. One day, late in the year, Carrie was in the control room at work, barely able to hold her head up. It became extremely difficult to walk. Carrie remembers telling her sergeant that there was something wrong with her, then sitting on the floor in front of the elevator and that it took everything she had to get herself up.  A co-worker helped her get to the hospital where a doctor ordered a tox screen that eventually revealed that her liver enzymes were extremely high.” Carrie was informed she was in liver failure and was immediately air lifted to Toronto. In Toronto, they put her in an induced coma and her name was placed at the top of the transplant list.

Many people—Carrie’s friends, family, coworkers, etc.—were tested to see if they were a match. In addition, they made public appeals over Facebook and complete strangers from all over Ontario signed up to be tested as potential living donors. The support was overwhelming.

Among the many who were checked as potential donors was Carrie’s son, Kyle. Within a few days, it was discovered that he was a perfect match. He donated 70% of his liver to his mom. And the transplant was a success.

Carrie with her son KyleA few days after the transplant surgery, Carrie was able to speak to her parents, and she expressed how horrible she felt that someone had to die so that she could live. They were able to tell her that, in fact, no one had died. Her mom choked back tears as she told Carrie that it was her own son who had saved her life.

Due to complications after her liver transplant, Carrie’s life is now very different than it used to be. She takes a few anti-rejection medications. Some days are good, and some days are bad.

Carrie reflects, “The person you were is not the person you will ever be again. For someone like me, who was working in a male-dominant world, I was strong and independent. Now, I struggle to find energy.”

“I am grateful to be here,” she continues. “The son who donated his liver to me had his first-born son in August. Now, I do not take anything for granted. I started smelling the roses and taking every moment in. I am so grateful to watch all three of my grandkids grow.”

A family photo in the park

“You do not realize how fast life flies by until you almost lose it.”

Carrie and Dan decided to bring the Canadian Liver Foundation’s annual Stroll for Liver to Pembroke to bring awareness about organ donation and liver health to their community.

Join Carrie and her family, register today.

 

 

The Canadian Liver Foundation acknowledges the following organizations for their support of the CLF’s mission of “bringing liver research to life” to benefit the liver health of all Canadians through research, education, patient support and advocacy.